THE DAGGERMAN is Released

THE DAGGERMAN is Released

THE DAGGERMAN, a Christian historical, has been released in all ebook formats and is AVAILABLE FOR PRE-ORDER of print copies on Amazon!

 

The Daggerman

Two men born under the same star on the same night are destined to lead intertwined, yet separate paths – one to save people, the other to kill them.

Yeshua is destined to fulfill the prophecies of the Messiah to come, while Hanan fights his country’s Roman oppressors and a corrupt, ruling priesthood. This heavily political and treacherous era is steeped in the subjugation of a people that have fought for their freedom since ancient times.

The devil has left his mark on Hanan from birth, and it fits him well as he, working alongside the Sicarii, ruthlessly eliminates his country’s Roman oppressors and the corrupt priests from the Sanhedrin Council of the Second Temple. With Yeshua as Hanan’s only true friend, Hanan must protect him from the devil yet conceal his own true identity as an assassin. Torn by the treachery of the time, Hanan knows he is damned by the devil’s mark and struggles with the choice of death or redemption.

 

Book Cover Design by Battle Cry Revival Marketing

 

The Councilman is Coming!

The Councilman is Coming!

The Councilman is Coming !!!

The Councilman

In 1956 Morgan City, Texas, Cory Hunter Bramley has finally returned to learn the truth about his mother’s murder. The killer may be gone, leaving Cory to chase ghosts, yet he’s determined to know what happened that fateful day sixteen years ago. But truth comes in many forms.

The town is under the thumb of a man who considers himself a king and makes Cory’s search for truth more difficult. Five women have been brutally murdered since his mother and their killer remains at large as well.

Cory must walk a dangerous maze of corruption, revenge, bootlegging, brutality and murder as he uncovers a bloody trail leading to the killer. But in the pursuit of justice, Cory didn’t anticipate finding love with the forbidden Emily.

The Councilman is a heartbreaking tale of vengeance, deceit and the anguish of shattered souls wrapped in mystery and suspense.

Cover Design by Battle Cry Revival

 

THE HONJO is released

THE HONJO is released

THE HONJO is RELEASED!

The Honjo

Greg Valdez walked away from stolen antiquities and the dark side of the art world years ago. No longer for hire as a professional thief, Valdez was enjoying retirement in the Texas Hill Country until the day Japan’s National Police and the Agency for Cultural Affairs disrupted his life wanting a national treasure returned. The Honjo Masamune, an ancient, priceless sword is being held in the United States by the Tonsei-Kai, a notorious Yakuza clan. The Japanese government will make a trade with Valdez—the sword in exchange for information about Kyla, Valdez’s former daughter in law. Kyla believes she is leaving for Japan to become an international model, but she’s caught in a Tonsei-Kai human trafficking ring. If Valdez will retrieve the sword, he can have the information to find her. It’s an offer he can’t refuse. She may never be seen again. But Valdez will need his son’s help to save her and doesn’t realize it will take a miracle to retrieve the sword—and save his own life. The pulse pounding sequel to SOLOMON’S MEN brings Valdez out of retirement and in search of THE HONJO….

Solomon’s Men

Available at these major booksellers and more:

Kobo

Amazon

Barnes & Noble

Book Cover Designs by Battle Cry Revival

SOLOMON’S MEN, The Graphic Novel is Coming

SOLOMON’S MEN, The Graphic Novel is Coming

   Yes, I’m a proud and happy author. My novel “Solomon’s Men” is to be published as a graphic novel in 2018, and—“The Honjo,” sequel to “Solomon’s Men,” will be released later in the year as well. This is fast becoming a stellar year for me. It’s been a long road with my writings, but the years of effort are finally proving worthwhile….

Last year was exhausting, though. Trying to finish a book; Hurricane Harvey destroying everything; the back and forth of contract negotiations, and a dozen other things—but life is good and getting better now!

 Today I have permission to post some of the fantastic artwork from the graphic novel. Unfortunately, I’m not at liberty to display names of the entertainment company, the artist, colorist, and writer but will do so once the graphic novel is published. They are a great team, truly talented, and my hat’s off to each for such professional work in visually bringing “Solomon’s Men” to life.

More information will be coming on “The Honjo” and the graphic novel. Be sure to check back for more news.

Solomon’s Men

My Journey With BLACK SUN

My Journey With BLACK SUN

Black Sun

Readers often ask authors where ideas come from for their novels. It’s a good question and one even I’ve asked of my author friends. For me, BLACK SUN was born from old stories about bandits, revolutionaries, and Indian war parties my maternal grandfather used to tell me; curiosity about his life while growing up in the violent devastation and corruption of old Mexico, and last, my interest in history.

Every novel I write begins as an entertaining story for readers, then at some point, I find myself delving deeper into the research because the book has taken life and I’m compelled to learn more. Such was the case with my novel Amazon Moon in which the maltreatment of the indigenous tribes in the Amazon jungle became one of the prime focuses within the book when initially it was to be the setting.

BLACK SUN truly took years to write. I’ve heard other authors say the same of their works and now I understand how that can be. Normally, a year and a half is my standard length of time to write a novel: a half year to kick it around in my head and do research, and a year to pound the keyboard into the wee hours of the night. Yes, there are those wizards of the written word that say they turn out a book in three months, and I’m happy for them if they can—but I’m not one.

So, armed with a few of my grandfather’s old stories swirling in my head, I began to ask my family questions about him. Little was known. He rarely spoke of his early years and everyone accepted his silence. He may have grown angry when no one believed him, or whatever may be the case, but he said almost nothing about his youth and parents. My other problem was that the related people who had tidbits of information were dead, dying, or didn’t want to reveal much. When you dig around in family histories you are treading on fragile ground. Hidden scars might be revealed or old wounds reopened.

I had come to believe that it was almost too late in life to gather anything credible then a saving grace arose when one of my aunts spoke of her genealogical work on the family tree. From her research I was able to glean trivia, birthdays, baptismal dates, birthplaces, residential locations, and official data from government records. Overlaying all of the family information on a historical timeline of Mexico, I matched family

news.berkeley.edu

news.berkeley.edu

dates and history. My thousand-piece puzzle was gradually coming together. From there I dug into the individual history of small towns, people, battles, government officials, etc., and unfolded more tragedy than I wished to know. Then the story I needed to write revealed itself to me.

Every story has to have a variety of characters, one aspect of writing that can drive an author to the brink of insanity to create. I had no such problems. Research on the key players of the Mexican Revolution of 1910 soon reached a point where I wondered if anyone would find them believable. Take Pancho Villa for example. While some called him a hero, others claimed he was nothing more than a thief and murderer. A crack shot, one moment he might draw his pistol and without remorse, shoot a man. The next, Villa might be emotionally moved and openly weep. A renown womanizer, he cared little for money and never held a desire to be the President of Mexico, always informing others that such a position required an educated man which he was not. The stories, whether true or fabricated, go on and on and are the foundation of many debates over Pancho Villa.

Francisco Madero, who called for the revolution against President Diaz, was a short, frail man with a bird-like voice that grew squeaky and high-pitched when he was angered, and irritating to everyone’s ears. He talked to ‘spirits’ who counseled him on actions to take, and in the end, violently died as almost every major player in the revolution did.

University of Chicago

University of Chicago

Most people believe the Mexican Revolution was nothing more than Pancho Villa fighting against President Diaz yet there is far more to the story than that. I also found a number of contradictions in the lives of the people which made it difficult to write a true portrayal of the times. The Spanish were hated for their brutal conquest and control of the country, yet after they were run out of the country, the rich, fair-skinned Mexican upper-class treated their own poor countrymen equally bad, looking down on them because of their darker skin. No education was provided and working in the fields was all a peasant was believed capable of. Native Indians were considered the lowest of creatures, expendable slave labor only. At one time a bounty was paid for Indian ears. That was eventually stopped when too many dark ears of peasants were brought in and declared to come from Indians.

Unemployment, government corruption, distrust of government officials, racism, alcoholism, drug addiction, and other social problems were as problematic in old Mexico as currently exist today in America. Chinese immigrants came by the thousands to Mexico and the citizens of Mexico complained they were taking away their jobs, creating a high rate of unemployment. Government corruption was the norm and no one trusted government officials to protect anyone except themselves. The fair-skinned Mexicans looked down upon the darker skinned peasants without true reason. Pulque, a cheap drink, and peyote and marijuana, prevalent hallucinatory plants, gave rise Triana Soldierto alcoholism and drug addiction. With no jobs, the only thing left to do was get high or get drunk. Murder, rape and torture were commonplace. Roving bands of bandits were accepted as either thieves or protectors against the government soldiers. Few, if any of the people, were left untouched by the events leading up to the revolution yet the poor kept love alive in their families and persevered in life, holding on to what little happiness they could find.

huracheblog

Huracheblog

BLACK SUN is a fictional account of my grandfather in his youth, but the everyday life of the people and the historical events, bandits, politicians, and birth of the revolution are all taken from interviews and countless research papers, diaries, personal journals, and books as I could find. Almost every character was researched so I could have authenticity about their actions, mannerisms, and demise in life.

Of course there will be debates from readers about who was truly good or bad in real life, but such discussions will always exist. At least I know that after reading BLACK SUN, people will have a realistic understanding of the Mexican Revolution of 1910, how it came about, and who were the participants in the civil war.

It’s a shame such a beautiful country as Mexico, rich in resources, culture, and great people, has had such a tragic history up to this very day. Until the government corruption, drug cartels, and high crime rate are brought under control, Mexico will always remain on the verge of another civil war.

I hope you will enjoy BLACK SUN. I look forward to your comments and thoughts on the book.

Glenn

BLACK SUN book cover design by Battle Cry Revival