«

»

A WRITER’S DILEMMA

 Micheal Rivers is best known as being a genuinely talented author of paranormal thrillers and true friend to the indie world. I’ve read several of his novels, truly enjoyed them, and I am quite fortunate to personally know such a fine gentleman. Previously, Nicholas Guild, a best-selling, international author, was kind enough to write a guest post for my site’s readers. Today, I am proud to include one by Micheal Rivers in my treasure chest of writing jewels. Whether you’re a seasoned novelist or novice, there is definitely something to learn from Mr. Rivers’ article.

A WRITER’S DILEMMA

Micheal Rivers

A writer is a wonderful individual. Throughout the centuries mankind has borrowed, purchased and cajoled anything they possibly could to either educate themselves or entertain themselves through books. Whether you are highly educated or you are just a beginning reader you will find enjoyment within the pages of a book. 

Let’s take a look at writing and how it is accomplished. I will use the works of fiction for this topic. Fiction is tool for the entertainment of readers, but it too has rules that need to be followed to be successful.

A novice writer may or may not realize how much preparation goes into a single work of fiction. Just as if you are writing non-fiction you have to research your subject matter. For every great work of fiction lies the grain of truth. Poor research on your subject will carry you into a story that is not plausible in any state and will destroy any efforts you have put into the book very quickly.

In your research the characters must remain in their original state, such as their manner of speech, or the way they conduct themselves. A sudden change in the character’s development will result in the destruction of what you have already introduced your reader to. The reader will keep this in mind and begin to automatically distrust the rest of the story regardless of its worth. This will come back to you when a book is reviewed by the public. Which would you rather have, a four or five star review or a two star stating your story is good but the characters lack substance?

A well written story will engross the reader to such a point minor mistakes may be overlooked to an extent. This being said I research my books almost to a fault. Trust me; you will still have readers to disagree due to their lack of research about what they doubt concerning what you have written.

 Many of your best writers place themselves in the story written from a witness’s point of view. You must distance yourself from that aspect unless you are capable of writing the story with a nonpartisan aspect. It is difficult but not impossible for newer writers in the field.

One of the biggest mistakes a new writer will make is believing he has written the perfect novel and will be beloved among his fellow authors. Usually his editing in his zeal for perfection is his death knell. A professional editor is a mandatory necessity. Although you have done this you will still find minor mistakes, the more eyes on your manuscript the better off you are. This is not saying release it to the public for scrutiny, far from it. Your objective is to give the reader the best story you possibly can and retain your style. Some editors will attempt to change things in your story which not only does not fit and cause hours of rewrites, but will also cause you to lose what your readers love about your stories. If your first release is poorly edited because you trusted your publisher, it is not the fault of the publisher. The final release is your responsibility and that story will come back to haunt you for years to come.

Do your words flow across the page or do they read as a conglomeration of statements? It will make a very large difference as to how your story will be perceived by a wide audience. You must remember the reader cannot read your thoughts or see what you are envisioning. You must lead him by the hand into a world you have created. Let him see what you see. Do your characters and settings induce emotional responses? This is very important also and must coordinate with the flow of the sentences.

I have dozens of people ask me who the protagonist is in a story. I neither build characters or protagonist. I, personally consider myself to build people, someone you can identify with if necessary. A person in a story cannot carry the story alone, just as in real life there is always somebody to share the burden in some form. This is only one point of view and I am sure there will be those who differ in opinion. I am happy with that; it makes the world a little brighter.

 If you succeed in getting the reader to understand your character, good or bad, you have succeeded in bringing the character to life. Written correctly he or she can become as three dimensional as you wish them to be. Rhyme and reason will take you far. 

Visit Micheal Rivers site at http://www.MichealRivers.com to learn more about him.

 

8 comments on “A WRITER’S DILEMMA

  1. Micheal Rivers,

    This is a great post about writing. I think you make many valid points.

    I’m learning that sequels are even more challenging. It is our hope to build up our main characters even more from the first book and add some new twists and turns into the mix.

    It is an honor and privilege to know you and your work. I hope to some day read Mr. Starkey’s work as well.

    • Thanks Lynn I think sequels are a big challenge also. I am still trying to catch up on three at one time along with the pleasures of life. Thank you very much for the compliment. You really should venture into Mr. Starkey’s work as soon as you can you won’t be disappointed.

  2. Michael. This is a post new and experienced writers should read. I agree that writing a manuscript is only about 50% of the effort. Editors are a must in our profession and their job is to smooth, correct and suggest– not change. It’s the story that counts. Many times I find more truth in fiction than in non-fiction.

    I also agree with your assessment of Glenn’s writing. He is a writer with a gift! As you are.

    • Thanks Dannie I love fiction writing, I have found there is more excitement there than what actually happens in real life. LOL Mr. Starkey lights a fire with everything he writes. I favor Neal Hock for his expertise in editing and found him very agreeable to work with.

  3. Great article and great advice!! I especially like your thoughts on protagonists and character building. Thanks, Micheal!!

    • Thank you Christine I would suggest for examples of what I am speaking about. Take a look at the protagonist in Solomon’s Men There is an excellent example there of characters and how they are built within this book.

  4. Thank you for the kind words Mr. Starkey. I appreciate the honor of being included on your blog pages. Nicholas Guild is truly an amazing writer and I find myself pleased to be associated with the both of you. Your talents should be well applauded also. I find few authors I truly appreciate these days and consider you to be among that short list.

    • Thank you, sir. I hope all levels of writers will read your article. There is always much to learn from experience.
      Regards,
      Glenn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

* Copy This Password *

* Type Or Paste Password Here *

15,758 Spam Comments Blocked so far by Spam Free Wordpress

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>